The Related Impact of WEATHER on consumer purchases

An article from Sudipto Ghosh from Marketing Technology Insights is a great read on the efforts from AccuWeather to use their data to help inform brands. The premise is that weather has an effect on certain purchasing behaviors. Remember the “Gotta Get the Bread and Milk” video (LINK)? Using weather data to inform and adjust your advertising is now possible.

AccuWeatherIQ will help advertisers connect with U.S. users experiencing a variety of weather conditions today, tomorrow, or “next weekend” to provide effective messaging based on lifestyle activities and health management preferences influenced by the weather.

The company AccuWeather has a data product called AccuWeatherIQ that; “will help advertisers connect with U.S. users experiencing a variety of weather conditions today, tomorrow, or “next weekend”. The objective is to provide effective messaging based on lifestyle activities and health management preferences influenced by the weather.”

The company has partnered with Salesforce, LiveRamp and Beemray to support marketing efforts informed by their data.

AccuWeather was in the news recently… well the CEO was called out by John Oliver.

The show Last Week Tonight did a piece on AccuWeather (LINK) – but John Olivers position was on his oposition to the CEO of AccuWeather becoming the head of the government organization NOAA.

RELATED IMPACT: The connection here is obvious. Knowing that consumers behave differently in different weather conditions and being able to use the weather forecast to programaticly change your marketing should have a related impact. I will be watching as we head into winter storm season here in the New York area to see what changes in my ads.

How do you talk about your customers?

Let’s take a look at a conversation that took place on Twitter.  As you read this, think about how your company talks about its customers.

The conversation to the write is:

  • Patrick wants to know why he should get YouTubeTV.  
  • YouTube TV does not say why – they reply that their “fam” will do the talking for them.  
  • Andrew (a member of “the fam”) chimes in with his reasons.  And, mentions why he is no longer with a competing service (DISH)
  • DISH decides to respond with a corporate statement about providing good customer service.  
Notice that when DISH talks about “our customers” it is cold and distant.  When YouTubeTV talks about their customers they call them “fam”.  
Related Impact:  When others read this, what will their impression of YouTubeTV and DISH be? IMO it shows that YouTubeTV is confident in their offering and encourage their customers to advocate for them.   DISH, on the other hand, chose to enter the conversation with a disingenuous answer.

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The little things matter

I have a hummingbird feeder by my front porch. The recipe is fairly simple 1/4 cup of sugar to 1 cup of water.  I tried last week to use the most organic plain sugar I could get which was raw sugar from Trader Joe’s.  After using the organic sugar I did not have much hummingbird activity. It turns out that the hummingbirds don’t love organic sugar they prefer the bleached white Domino Sugar.  After whipping up a small batch with the regular sugar the hummingbirds eagerly came back to the feeder.  

This small change that in my opinion was more natural and better for them turned out to reduce their frequency.   It is interesting because you can often find the same behavior in software usability. Companies will make an update and change something that they perceive as very small and in the users best interest yet customers just do not like it.  Many times, you will not get emails telling you that they are unhappy, they will just reduce usage.  This is why it is important to have a baseline behavior measured.  That way after the change you can see if there is any affect on usage.  I admit that I don’t always take a baseline measure before making many changes but the hummingbirds reminded me how important it is.

Sometimes a major update causes major issues

Tonight “Developer Epic Games has announced that Fortnite servers are being shut down due to several issues with game services.” 

https://www.dexerto.com/fortnite/epic-games-is-shutting-down-fortnite-servers-due-to-major-issues-with-fortnites-matchmaking-and-login-services-updating 

After after a major update sometimes you can encounter major problems and that seems to be what happened tonight 4 the popular game fortnite.  

The the company has been not only working on solving the problem but doing a very good job with keeping the community up to date through all social channels on their progress.  It is impressive to see how well people are taking the outage and supportive of the company as they work through this.   

Google allows you to edit how Ads can target you.

There have been so many news stories this year about how advertisers can and do target people.  Facebook has been making the testimony rounds with the US Senate and EU officials.  All this brings to lite the issue of what do platforms know about their users and how do they leverage that information for advertisers so that they can target the right people for their message. As someone that runs many ad campaigns, proper targeting is an important factor when I determine how much budget I am going to devote to my ads.   Google has created a new tool for ALL users to be able to go in and SEE how Google is profiling them to advertisers.  AND, AND, you have the ability to turn off any of the personalizations that you want to.  

You can CLICK HERE or the image below to go see how you are being profiled.  

All this talk about a paid version of Facebook

There is a lot of talk in the media these days about creating a paid version of Facebook.  Today Facebook makes money from advertisers that would like to target their message to a specific group of people.  In an article on MakeUseOf.com they do a good job of laying our how complicated a major change in the unit economics may effect Facebook.  Not that my opinion matters to Facebook, but what about a revenue share so that each user gets a small piece of the advertising pie?  Facebook would clearly keep the lions share.  It is their platform, their servers, their expertise, their ad management programs, etc… but then each of the 2 billion users would share in the advertising revenue.  Just a thought.

Another day… another breach

Today is just another day when a company announces that they have messed up with our personal data.  Today is Orbitz that had hackers gain access to 880,000 credit cards from customers spanning from January 2016 to December 2017. 

According to the article: “The hackers also likely accessed other data, like names, physical or mailing addresses, birth dates, email addresses, phone numbers and the customer’s gender”

What I don’t see in all these articles is Victim Compensation.  When customers fly and the airline has a delay they often compensate the affected people.  I have experienced the small ones like when we are waiting to take off and they come around with a free drink or premium snack to bonus miles if the delay is particularly long.  When Experian was hacked the compensation was credit monitoring service, not a good compensation for screwing things up, but it is something.  Something needs to be done for the victims of these hacks.  

Moving to the business side of these issues for a moment.  I wonder WHY the public is not informed on what companies like Orbitz are doing to go after the ‘hackers’.  I personally would like to know that Orbitz is mad, very mad about this and what they are doing to fight back.  The article states; “The company also notes that its current site is not affected by this breach and that it brought in third-party experts and a forensic investigation firm, as well as law enforcement, to “eliminate and prevent unauthorized access to the platform.” But, there is no mention of going after the data, going after the people that hacked them, it is just trying to stop it from happening again – which I assumed they were doing in the first place. 

Here is the link to the TechCrunch article